How the 2010s Shifted the Fashion Paradigm


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Part of life is looking at old photos and questionable fashion choices and wondering “what in the world was I thinking?” The 2010s have a lot to answer for when it comes to shifting the fashion paradigm, so let’s take a look at this informative period and try and understand why we wore what we did. Each decade has its own treasure trove of good, bad and ugly… so fear not, there will be many more fashion decisions to regret in the future.

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Celebrating every shape, size and colour

The 2010s have really seen an increase in Australian plus-size models. The runway, catalogues, and anything adjacent to fashion has always been for a certain size and look. It took a long time but now we see a broad range of healthy-shaped women. There is also a movement toward embracing stretch marks and all those beautiful things that make us unique, shaping a realistic representation of what men and women look like.

The fashion industry has a long way to go in showcasing people of colour in their fashion, but we are seeing progress in the last decade. The Black Lives Matter movement has been critical in addressing the lack of representation in all areas of society, fashion included. We are seeing more cultures represented, and even makeup lines have extended their shade colour collections to include the full spectrum of light to dark.

 

Hipster fashion

Hipster fashion has to be one of the cornerstones of this decade. Intentionally wearing clothes that do not match, and usually correlate to completely different styles is all part of the lock. If you’re not a fan of hipster fashion, you have to admit that it is a ballsy position to take on high-end labels and mindlessly follow one trend. Plus, who doesn’t want to be an individual? A large driving factor of this fashion trend is thrift shops and the second-hand movement, which gains more and more momentum now that it is seen as a sustainable way of living.

 

Athleisure

The Athleisure fashion trend is one that is showing no signs of slowing down. Who would’ve thought that brands like Nike, Adidas and really any sports brand would appeal to so many demographics and lifestyles? Wearing the athleisure style well is less about how often you exercise but how it all comes together. It is now totally acceptable to do the groceries, go out to lunch, hang out at home, and just do anything while wearing activewear. Sure, you could wear jeans, but isn’t it just comfier to wear some yoga pants and a baggy sports jumper? Yes!

 

Exaggerated fashion

You’d be forgiven for thinking that the fashion runway still takes place in a loft-style space with seats lining the runway. Fashion runways are taking place in some of the most strange places since the 2010s, private or public. This has given way to how fashion is worn too. Users will mix formal with casual and really make a statement with exaggerated pieces. Strangely shaped sunglasses, high top sneakers with an evening dress, tiny handbags and huge hairclips… it certainly appears like all bets are off with this exaggerated fashion trend.

 

The influence of makeup

Makeup trends often go hand-in-hand with fashion trends, and this is certainly the case with the 2010s. Contouring has to be the biggest make-up trend we have seen in the past decade. Men and women can ultimately shape how their face appears with the use of light and dark powders. Many have called this the Kardashian effect. YouTube, and specifically YouTube tutorials, have also given access to users to learn how to do professional makeup and create a style with these techniques.

Ah the 2010s, what a time to be alive! If these trends seem interesting or a little crazy to you now, consider how you are dressing now and whether you will always reflect fondly on these trends.

 

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Written by Lola McQuenzie

Lola is one of our most busy writer, She worked for Catwalk Yourself since 2007 and still producing her 2-3 artiles per week. Lola graduaded at Central St Martins and started working wth us soon after


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